This is a GREAT resource for high school students and their parents. Check it out !

"Most students take out loans for their education. However, many people aren’t ready for the financial punch that repaying them can deliver. Thankfully, there are a lot of little measures students can take to minimize their payments before, during, and after college."

Let’s face it. College tuition can be expensive. If you think about it in real terms, the annual cost of attending some colleges can equate to purchasing a new car each year. It seems absurd, right? Like many others, you might be wondering “How am I ever going to pay for college” and “Is there anything that I can do to lower my costs?” As a college graduate, current graduate student, and high school teacher, I’ve learned a few tricks on how to save on college:

This is good news for anyone who will be using the Federal Student and Parent Loans to help finance college costs.

This article has good advice for everyone!

"Cost of attendance" or “COA”  is an ESTIMATE of the total amount it will cost you to go to school—usually stated as a yearly figure. COA includes tuition and fees; room and board (or a housing and food allowance); and allowances for books, supplies, transportation, loan fees, and dependent care. It also includes miscellaneous and personal expenses, including an allowance for the rental or purchase of a personal computer; costs related to a disability; and reasonable costs for eligible study-abroad programs. For students attending less than half-time, the COA includes tuition and fees and an allowance for books, supplies, transportation, and dependent care expenses, and can also include room and board for up to three semesters or the equivalent at the institution. 

Yes, soon-to-be high school seniors- your time has come! As you bask in the excitement of the upcoming year, set aside time this summer to lay the groundwork for a smooth college process. Trust me, you will be thankful you did later!”

Let’s face it. College tuition can be expensive. If you think about it in real terms, the annual cost of attending some colleges can equate to purchasing a new car each year. It seems absurd, right? Like many others, you might be wondering “How am I ever going to pay for college” and “Is there anything that I can do to lower my costs?”

Check our web site for additional information about saving for college , and outside scholarship resources

Are you a high school senior? Time to Get Ready to Apply For and Pay For College

These “Top TenTips for Planning and Paying for College” were originally published by SallieMae. We’ve amended some of them to focus on Louisiana and Loyola programs,

  1. Make the most of high school academics and activities: Select courses that meet college admissions requirements. Develop your interests and talents through additional activities. LOUISIANA STUDENTS: Make sure you are taking courses to meet TOPS Scholarship Requirements
  2. Find a college that fits you:Use Internet, resources, brochures, campus visits, and college fairs to find schools that meet your academic and personal needs.
  3. Take appropriate standardized tests : The SAT and/or the ACT are usually required for college admissions. Use a test prep book or online practice tool to get ready.
  4. Familiarize yourself with the college application process : Make a list of all deadlines and required recommendations, essays, transcripts, test scores, etc.Investigate scholarship opportunities early. Scholarships are based on a variety of criteria and can be found on the Internet, in scholarship guides, and through sponsoring groups.
  5. Beware of scholarship scams: No one can guarantee you a scholarship in advance, and you should  never have to pay a fee for scholarship searches. 
  6. Understand college costsIn addition to tuition, room and board, you also will need to cover fees, books, transportation, and personal expenses.
  7. Research your eligibility for federal and state financial aid : Two-thirds of all full-time undergraduate students receive some kind of financial aid, so odds are you are eligible, too.
  8. Complete the FAFSA annually in January: This is required to be considered for federal student aid. It can also be required by colleges, state agencies, and some scholarships.
  9. Explore student and parent loans : Borrow only what you absolutely need. Start with federal student loan programs, which usually provide the best terms.
  10. If you are a veteran, check out the special financial aid programs available to you and your family.  

©2008 The Salle Mae Fund. All Rights Reserved.

We look forward to working with you during the upcoming academic year.